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Posts from the ‘mindfulness’ Category

How can mindfulness help in the classroom?

November 7th, 2017

Heather Johnston

A short video with Jon Kabat-Zinn about why mindfulness is so important in the classroom ( first 3 minutes talks specifically to the classroom)

Interested in finding out bringing mindfulness to your school? I offer dotbfoundations or MBSR/MBCT 8 week pre-requisite courses for teachers in the Essex/Suffolk area and also can train the pawsb course for 7-11 year olds. Find out more about these courses at the mindfulness in schools website 

Want to hear a bit more? Listen to Richard Burnett, who designed the dotb course for teenagers (20 minutes)

 

It’s not what you do it is how you do it or the 9 attitudes of mindfulness

April 19th, 2017

Heather Johnston

Have a listen to what Jon Kabat-Zinn has to say about practicing mindfulness in sitting practice or in everyday life. There is a first introductory video and then Jon goes on to talk about the following attitudes which he discussed in his book Full Catastrophe Living:

Non Judging   Patience  Beginners’s mind  Trust  Non Striving  Acceptance  Letting Go  Gratitude and Generosity

 

…and this compilation seems to have missed acceptance!

 

Introducing Heartfulness- Balanced Mind: Kind Mind Course

April 11th, 2017

Heather Johnston

IMG_4534As many of you are aware, over the last year I have been doing some additional mindfulness training focused on friendship (or loving kindness) and compassion practices. I am now one of the first 20 or so people trained in this new course in the UK while it has been running for a longer time in Europe! I have personally gained so much from these practices- a greater feeling of happiness, a way of self soothing when things get tough and for those of us in the caring and helping professions a way of dealing with the possibilities of burnout from empathy fatigue.

I am running the course in 2 parts, before and after the summer hols. Designed as either a stand alone course or as a continuation from other mindfulness courses. This course centres around developing kindness, compassion and self compassion, joy and equanimity. Our best homes.

The material is developed from the work of Sharon Salzberg, Paul Gilbert and Erik van den Brink (mindfulness based compassionate living). It is underpinned with the latest research into affective and social neuroscience and what we need to build a happy healthy mind. This is complemented with the latest from positive psychology and the long lineage of metta meditation. Which means loving kindness or friendship.

The course is particularly helpful to those that care for others, both in a professional and non professional capacity. Helping us find balance, nourish and develop kindness and compassion for ourselves and others

Course Outline

Each course focuses on eight key themes, all interlinking and building each week through home practice.

Session 1: Our three emotional regulation systems

Session 2: Stress reactions and self compassion

Session 3: Our inner patterns (your internal voice)

Session 4: Compassion

Session 5: Our relationship with ourself and others

Session 6: Our common humanity and happiness for all

Session 7: Heartfulness in daily life

Session 8: Self healing and compassion

Self directed, choice based home practise is an integral part of the course, as it enables you to establish the skills that you are learning and apply them and see the benefits in your daily life. Participants are encouraged to be kind with themselves in finding a way to make heartfulness practise work for them.

Benefits of kindness, compassion and self compassion

Loving-kindness meditation was best in increasing positively valenced and other- focused thought and was the only practice to positively link thoughts of self and others.

The following was adapted from the Greater Good’s article on the top 10 insights of the science of a meaningful life:

A German study led by Tania Singer, recruited novice meditators to participate in a nine-month mindfulness training. They learned four different types of meditation: breathing meditation, body scan, loving-kindness meditation, and observing-thought meditation. In the end, the researchers found some common benefits: During every type of meditation, participants reported feeling more positive emotions, more energetic, more focused on the present, and less distracted by thoughts than they did before beginning—perhaps thanks to the attention training that’s common to all meditation. Loving-kindness meditation led to the greatest boost in their feelings of warmth and positive thoughts about others.

How much, When and Where?

I am currently focusing on my work within organisations. If you are interested in bringing mindfulness and/or compassion practices to your workplace do get in contact.

To undertake this course it is useful to have some grounding in mindfulness meditation…or the course can be taken as a standalone or deepening and expanding the meditation experience developed through other mindfulness courses such as MBSR or MBCT.

Who should attend mindfulness courses?

Mindfulness is generally available to most people, however for some it may be best to be trained by someone with a specific clinical qualification (such as those with an acute mental health condition).

For some people challenges can arise while meditating for a number of different reasons. While each of us is different, If you are going through a major life event (such as having been recently bereaved or divorced) or suffering from mental ill health (eg acute depression) have a learning disability or have just been diagnosed with an upsetting physical illness (eg cancer) it is best to wait and leave attending a course until life is a little more settled for you or find a course that is more specialised to your particular needs. This can be discussed with Heather and it is for this reason why we ask everyone to fill in a course screening form so that we can best support your needs or help you to find someone who can.

The course is not designed to discuss any current or past personal problems not related to the practises and if necessary, these should be pursued through individual work with a counsellor or other appropriate support.

My training

Heather has undertaken two MBSR/MBCT teacher training retreats (TTR 1&2) with the Centre for mindfulness and research practice at the University of Bangor, one of the leaders in the field for mindfulness in the UK, along with advanced mindfulness training course in mindfulness based compassionate living and further training in deep listening. Some of the people that have trained Heather include: Michael Chaskalson, Trish Bartley, Jody Mardula, Sarah Silverton, Erik van den Brink, Ros Oliver, Rasmus Hougaard and Jacqueline Carter. She has also attended masterclasses with: Profs Paul Gilbert, Tania Singer and Associate Professor Kristin Neff. See my bio here.

What’s the most important minute in your life?

February 17th, 2017

Heather Johnston

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The very early signs of Spring are in the air and in this issue of Spring Reflections I wanted to use the garden as a metaphor to explore the wellbeing of you, your staff and your organisation.
So how does your garden grow? 
Gardens are complex ecosystems that need tending and care to keep them looking at their best. There are many shapes, sizes and styles of gardens and each need tailored care to their own specific needs. Keeping the garden healthy, flourishing and in tune with the wider environment needs constant attention.

On a personal level we can relate this garden analogy to our minds. How much attention are you paying to how healthy your mind is? Do you do a few overhauls a year or some steady tending week by week? Dr Rick Hanson uses the garden analogy as a useful metaphor to explore how we might build healthy minds to support us in our life today:

What would you like to let be?
What needs weeding? (let go)
What extra nourishment and sowing do we need to provide? (let in)
How we perform our day to day work and how we experience our life is very much driven by how healthy our minds are- are the weeds out of control or are we feeling truly nourished and happy?

This analogy obviously also works with organisations too, how is your ecosystem thriving? What might you need to GROW?

Backed up by the latest research on neuroplasticity, taking in the good, mind training, kindness and compassion I can work with individuals, teams and organisations to help to add a bit of fertiliser and/or help you tend a few weeds. So if you fancy a different take on your standard staff training programs, coaching, or team development then do give me a call. I can offer off the shelf and tailored interventions focused around

Staff wellbeing, strengths and happiness
Leadership and management development
Team Development
Coaching and Supervisory skills
Mind training for attention, creativity and self care for adults and children
Compassion and kindness interventions
Creative arts

So if you are an individual, blue chip organisation, small business, charity, school or government organisation I may have something to help. All prices are tailored to sector and ability to pay. Curious?

 

Got some questions?  Then please do get in touch to explore on 07801 246113 or via email heather@mindtrip.co.uk

Know someone that this may interest?… Then please do forward this mail with the links below…

It would be lovely to reconnect with those that I haven’t spoken to for a while even if you don’t have an immediate need!

Mindfulness Courses for 2018

January 15th, 2016

Heather Johnston

Would you like to generate feelings of greater peace in your life? To feel happier, more resilient and more in control?

Mindfulness is a way of being in the present moment so that we become more aware and fully present, noticing what is unfolding moment by moment with a sense of spaciousness, curiosity, acceptance and love. Mindfulness is a practice to nourish our minds rather like what we do for our bodies. By spending time training our minds, we can notice where our attention is and with kindness bring our focus back to where we would like it to be. Mindfulness is in effect a workout for our minds.

There are many scientific research studies into the benefits of mindfulness, with more and more research conducted each year. Scientifically validated studies into mindfulness meditation, specifically MBSR and MBCT have found:

  • Increases in positive emotions and contentment and decrease in anxiety and stress
  • Decrease in pain and inflammation
  • Increased mental stamina and resilience
  • Increased focus, attention and memory improvement
  • Increased creativity, empathy and compassion

Finding Peace in a Frantic World

NEXT CLASSES START  : I am currently focusing on delivering courses within organisations, if you would like to bring mindfulness to your workplace do contact me 

This course is based on the best selling book: Finding Peace in a Frantic World by Mark Williams and Danny Penman. The course runs over 8 sessions with guided group meditations and exercises that introduce you to the foundations of mindfulness. Each week you will be invited to undertake some home practise which helps you to build a mindfulness practice and build resilience in everyday life. Participants will need to buy the book which is available at bookstores and online.

BOOK HERE

(sign up to newsletter to be informed of future dates)

81% people who took my mindfulness courses to date felt less stressed, 83% feel less anxious, 95% are more aware and 82% feel better about themselves

Mindfulness is a way of being in the present moment so that we become more aware and fully present, noticing what is unfolding moment by moment with a sense of spaciousness, curiosity, acceptance and love. Mindfulness is a practice to nourish our minds rather like what we do for our bodies. By spending time training our minds, we can notice where our attention is and with kindness bring our focus back to where we would like it to be. Mindfulness is in effect a workout for our minds.

 

This course is for the general public and is based on the Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) course developed by Dr Mark Williams and colleagues at the University of Oxford.

On the course, you will learn practices such as the Body Scan, Mindful Movement and Sitting Meditations with the aim of taking what you learn in these practices and applying them in your everyday life.

The course focuses on eight key themes outlined in the best selling book Finding Peace in a Frantic World, all interlinking and building each week through home practice.

Home practise is an integral part of the course, as it enables you to establish the skills that you are learning and apply them and see the benefits in your daily life. Each participant is encouraged to undertake approximately 10-20 minutes daily practice, six days per week, between each class. This at times can be a challenge to fit in and participants are encouraged to be kind with themselves in finding a way to make mindfulness practise work for them. The longer time given to practise the greater the benefits!

The course is most effective if you can try to attend all sessions as each session builds on the previous session. Attendance certificates are given to those that attend 7 or more sessions.

For those interested in training as a mindfulness teacher in schools, this course fulfils one of the prerequisites.

See what previous course participants have said here and here

Who should attend mindfulness courses?

Mindfulness is generally available to most people, however for some it may be best to be trained by someone with a specific clinical qualification (such as those with an acute mental health condition).
For some people challenges can arise while meditating for a number of different reasons. While each of us is different, If you are going through a major life event (such as having been recently bereaved or divorced) or suffering from mental ill health (eg acute depression) have a learning disability or have just been diagnosed with an upsetting physical illness (eg cancer) it is best to wait and leave attending a course until life is a little more settled for you or find a course that is more specialised to your particular needs. This can be discussed with your course leader and it is for this reason why we ask everyone to fill in a course screening form so that we can best support your needs or help you to find someone who can.
The course is not designed to discuss any current or past personal problems not related to the practises and If necessary, these should be pursued through individual work with a counsellor or other appropriate support.

Already completed an 8 week MBSR or MBCT course? I will be running A day of silence/retreat  this SUMMER on August 8th at The Granary SUDBURY (free parking) between 9.30am and 3.30pm. The cost is £60. Tea and Coffee facilities are available and you will need to bring your own lunch (which will be in silence).

The day will incorporate practices learnt on your MBSR/MBCT course and include some new meditations to strengthen your practice and cultivate further a sense of mindful presence. The day will be held mostly in silence and we will intersperse sitting meditations with movement based meditation and make the most of the beautiful countryside nearby. If the weather is kind to us we will take some of the practice outside so bring sunscreen and a hat!

To apply and book please contact Heather direct at 07801 246113 or via email enquiries@mindtrip.co.uk

 

What have you done to help others lately?

November 4th, 2013

Heather Johnston

Why do I ask? Because it may just help you too…At the end of October, I attended the empathy and compassion conference in society and was transported into a truly inspiring atmosphere of the latest research and thinking around ways to help improve our individual and collective resilience, so as to build a more compassionate society.

We as human beings are naturally programmed to help others, you only need to look at acts of bravery and courage (both big and small) to see how much they are rooted in putting other people before ourselves.

Taking a secular view on thinking from Buddhist meditation practices, researchers have found that those that meditate regularly develop an ability to self soothe themselves when times get tough, maintain perspective and once they get themselves balanced have a greater ability to act compassionately towards others without getting burnout.

The key? Is self compassion. When things gets tough in our ‘threat and drive’ based work organisations we all have a tendency to be our biggest internal critic and this then leeches out into a wider culture of the survival of the strongest with potentially devastating impact on people’s wellbeing, cooperation, productivity and society as a whole.

Through starting to be kinder to ourselves and being a bit more self compassionate, we naturally will start to act more compassionately towards others and this can impact up to 3 degrees of separation from ourselves, as well as increase our own wellbeing and happiness. Benefits to work organisations? Researchers have shown this is good for business too..those that start to develop more balanced work cultures that value acts of giving towards others see increased staff loyalty, increased customer service and reduced turnover as well as a reduced health bill from the impact of stress.

Want to find out where to start? Have a look at the links through this article and all it takes to get going is just 7 minutes meditation a day to take a deep breath, stop and be still. Spending time becoming aware of our own mind is a first step towards helping yourself and helping others.

 

Getting in touch with our deeper self

June 24th, 2013

Heather Johnston

How often do you go through a day carried in a stream of busyness and doing? Constantly running from meeting to meeting, call to call or rushing to get things done. In doing this, how often do you get chance to take stock of where you are at your deepest level-listening to that small voice or feelings that get trampled on in the rush or pushed aside-until we have more time to think things through?

Mindfulness is a way of being in the present moment so that we become more aware and fully present, noticing what is unfolding moment by moment and allowing a sense of spaciousness and non judgement. Mindfulness encourages us to wake up to our deeper selves, it shapes us and deepens our self and other compassion along with our wisdom and wellbeing. However in practicing mindfulness, we are not as such trying to get anywhere other than to be fully present and getting out of our own way.

Why might this be important in the world of work? It is about the quality of attention you are giving while you are at work and for that matter out of work. Can you trust the quality of decisions that you are making? Are you listening to your deeper intuitions? Have you brought your whole self to bear? In life decisions are you connected with what is deep and best within your self rather than what is at the top of your ‘mind’ or what you are reacting against?

The following video filmed by Action for happiness at their evening with Jon Kabat Zinn which I attended in March, talks more about mindfulness and gives you an experience of what it is all about:

 

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